Whitby Goth Weekend

So this weekend I’ve been out and about shooting at the Goth weekend in Whitby on assignment for Getty Images …as always it’s a challenge to try and get something new or at least a little different and with bad weather on the Saturday it didn’t make it any easier but here’s a few from the weekend…

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Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in the galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

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NYMR Wartime Weekend

A very wet Sunday didn’t seem to dampen the spirits too much of those who went along to take part in the North Yorkshire Moors Railway Wartime Weekend this year.

Wartime re-enactors or those with a nostalgic connection to that era dress in period clothing or uniforms and travel the historic steam line between the stations of Grosmont, Goathland, Levisham and Pickering as they immerse themselves in the music, the clothing and World War Two for the weekend…

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Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in the galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

Conservative Party Conference 2018

For five days last week I was down in Birmingham at the International Convention Centre covering the annual Conservative Party Conference. The days are long and it’s a hard and challenging few days shooting pictures that will hopefully give a good overview on the conference.

Along with trying to get pictures of the main political players as they are ushered through the venue with various levels of security and PR handlers as they attend TV interviews or meetings you also need to keep an eye on other things that are taking place. Fringe meetings, key arrivals, well known visitors who might be attending or just general scenes of the place and the people that will all add to the broader coverage of the event.

Then of course you have the conference speeches. They are challenging enough as it is with generally bad lighting photographically speaking, but then add in restrictions on where you can and can’t go which are always highlighted on the floor of the main auditorium by white tape. Then you add the fact you have to keep low to avoid blocking the view of the audience  so you spend much of the time crawling and crouching around on your knees in front of the stage as you carry all your camera gear. At the same time you’re also trying to move into a position that might make a good angle and work the whole conference hall so you get pictures from as many different angles and distances from stage as possible then it all becomes even more challenging. Especially when there are 40-50 other photographers and video cameramen all trying to do the same at key speeches.

It can be both rewarding and frustrating in equal measures. Sometimes you find a good spot and all the factors come together. A good position, good angle, decent animation from the subject, eye-line, a clear view, right lens choice and it’ll work. Often times some of those variables don’t come together and the shoot isn’t as good or indeed it’s just a crap picture.

Sometimes…you get lucky and things work out. Or they don’t. But you keep cracking on anyway.

But despite the challenges, despite the aching knees from crawling about on the carpet down in front of the main stage or the aching shoulders from carrying all the kit, despite surviving most of the days on coffee and an occasional quick bite. Despite spending half the time on the conference floor sweating your arse off I still quite enjoy it – from a photographic and obviously twisted stand point anyway.

When you can get a good picture then of course you’re happy. It something gets published then that’s good too although often times you think you have a good picture and then see how someone else covered the same event and then you basically swear at yourself a lot, wonder why you didn’t think of that particular angle or that particular way of doing it, swear a bit more, drink some coffee and then wander off, swearing at yourself some more, and try and do better with what comes next.

So as conference season comes to a close (you can see my Labour Conference coverage HERE ) here are a few from the trip down to Birmingham…

Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in the galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

Northern Spire

The Northern Spire bridge in Sunderland opened to traffic today.

The cable stayed bridge across the River Wear is the first to be built on the river in over 40 years. Although set with an original opening date of May, poor weather conditions in the early months of 2018 led to the £117.6 million project being delayed.

The bridge has a 105 metre tall central A-frame pylon and is the tallest structure in the North East.

It it hoped that the bridge will reduce congestion in the city, open up land for regeneration along the river, improve links between the A19 road and Sunderland city centre and the Port of Sunderland, whilst also boosting the economy and helping to create an estimated 6,000 jobs in the area.

More than 2,000 people have worked on the bridge during the last three years of construction, clocking up a million work-hours.

The day before it opened to traffic there was a pedestrian ‘walk-over’ event lasting several hours giving members of the public the chance to walk across the bridge.

Below are a selection of picture from the last two days and please feel free to follow the link to a blog post I did as the central pylon was lifted into position back in February 2017: Room2850 – Building Bridges

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Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in the galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.

York Stone Carving Festival

Stonemasons take part in a stone carving festival at York Minster on August 19, 2018 in York, England.

More than seventy craftspeople took part in the festival with participants travelling from a range of countries including Germany, Norway and Cyprus, as well as locations across the UK. The masons spent two days carving on the theme ‘All creatures great and small’, with the finished pieces due to be auctioned at the end of the festival.

Funds raised from then event will be reinvested in maintaining the 800-year-old cathedral.

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Images (c) Ian Forsyth / Getty Images

See more of my work in the galleries & blog at Room 2850

All rights reserved.

No usage without arrangement.